ARCHAELOGY 

A 3,800-year-old Tableau of Egyptian Boats has been found

Around 120 images of ancient Egyptian boats have been found inside a building in Abydos, Egypt. The building dates back more than 3,800 years and was built close to the tomb of Pharaoh Senwosret III, report archaeologists at the site. The series of images, or tableau as it is called, once looked upon a real boat that sat within the buildings walls states the leader of the excavation, Josef Wegner, a curator at the Penn Museum at the University of Pennsylvania. The wooden boat is now more or less gone with only…

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ARCHAELOGY 

Remarkable Tattooed Mummy Brought Back To Life In Stunning Realistic Recreation

We still may not know what killed the Señora of Cao in Peru 1,600 years ago, but we now know what she looked like when she was alive. Ira Block/National Geographic; Fundación Augusto N Wiese No one knows what killed the Señora of Cao nearly 1,600 years ago. But whatever the cause, her untimely passing must have been upsetting to her people, the Moche, who lived on the north coast of Peru between approximately and 100 and 700 C.E., at least seven centuries before the more well-known Inca. After the…

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ARCHAELOGY 

Top 10 archaeological discoveries of 2016

2016 has revealed an amazing array of archaeological discoveries, pushing the boundaries of scientific research and our understanding of the past. The following list represents 10 of the most exciting announcements across the year. 1 – Bronze Age stilt houses unearthed in East Anglian Fens Archaeologists have revealed exceptionally well-preserved Bronze Age dwellings during a series of excavations throughout the year at Must Farm quarry in the East Anglian fens that is providing an extraordinary insight into domestic life 3,000 years ago. The settlement, dating to the end of the…

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ARCHAELOGY 

3000-Year-Old Pharaoh Ramses II Statue Found In Cairo Slum, And It’s “One Of The Most Important Discoveries Ever”

Other ruins of Heliopolis were previously found in the Northern regions of Cairo, making this statue extremely likely to be Ramses II Image credits: Xinhua/ Rex The sun temples were purportedly double the size of Luxor’s Karnak, but were destroyed during Greco-Roman times Image credits: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/ Reuters The unearthing of these statues will hopefully tell us even more about the life of Ancient Egyptian Pharaohs, including Ramses the Great Image credits: Mohamed Abd El Ghany / Reuter Source

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ARCHAELOGY 

Picatrix: An ancient manuscript that teaches how to obtain ENERGY from the COSMOS

Picatrix is the name used today, for a 400-page book of magic and astrology. Scholars assume was originally written in the middle of the 11th century. The work is divided into four books, which exhibit a marked absence of systematic exposition. “Through this ancient manuscript…the reader could attract and channel the energy of the cosmos so that a certain event develops according to the will of the practitioner, zodiacal magic; which is said to help master and dominate with accuracy—through the force of the universe—nature and its surroundings.” Picatrix explains not…

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ARCHAELOGY 

Ancient Egyptian mummy at the Louvre has a face covered by an unusual interwoven square pattern

There are more than 50,000 pieces that comprise the fantastic collection at the Department of Egyptian Antiquities of the Louvre of Paris. Collectibles include various artifacts from the Nile civilizations that span more than four millennia, from 4,000 BC to the 4th century AD. Counted as one of the world’s largest such collections, it gives a detailed overview of Egyptian life and customs from the earliest days of the Ancient Egypt, through the Middle Kingdom and the New Kingdom, as well as the Ptolemaic, Roman, and Byzantine eras. The collections…

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ARCHAELOGY 

USA: Ruins of Viking Settlement Discovered near Hudson River

A team of lanscaping workers, proceeding to an excavation near the banks of the Hudson river, has discovered the archeological remains of a Norse village dating from the 9th or 10th Century AD. The workers were digging with a mechanical shovel near the shores of Minisceongo creek, when they stumbled upon the ruins of an ancient building. A team of archaeologists linked to Columbia University, was called to the site to inspect the findings, and they rapidly identified the site as a possible Viking settlement. They proceeded to extend the excavation, and…

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Evidence of Advanced Civilizations living on Earth more than 100,000 years ago?

What do we really know about the history and past of the human race? Has our species been on planet Earth only a couple of thousand years as mainstream researchers suggest? Or is it possible that ancient advanced civilizations inhabited our planet hundreds of thousands of years ago? Recently, several discoveries seem to point to the possibility that ancient civilizations called the planet Earth “home” much earlier than previously thought. Why mainstream researchers choose to ‘ignore’ details and clues pointing to the existence of civilizations that are much older than…

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ARCHAELOGY 

The story behind the world’s oldest museum, built by a Babylonian princess 2,500 years ago

In 1925, archaeologist Leonard Woolley discovered a curious collection of artifacts while excavating a Babylonian palace. They were from many different times and places, and yet they were neatly organized and even labeled. Woolley had discovered the world’s first museum. It’s easy to forget that ancient peoples also studied history – Babylonians who lived 2,500 years ago were able to look back on millennia of previous human experience. That’s part of what makes the museum of Princess Ennigaldi so remarkable. Her collection contained wonders and artifacts as ancient to her…

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ARCHAELOGY 

To Open or Not to Open The 1,650-Year-Old Speyer Wine Bottle?

Contemporary historians have been debating for a few years now if they should open the Speyer wine bottle, which is believed to be the world’s oldest bottle of wine. The Pfalz Historical Museum in Germany has been home to the legendary 1,650-year-old bottle that is sealed with wax and contains a white liquid. The Speyer wine bottle. (Immanuel Giel/CC BY SA 3.0) History of Wine Even though the oldest evidence of wine production was found in Armenia around 4100 BC, it would be safe to say that Western tradition of…

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