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ARCHAELOGY 

Treasure Hunter that Found Unique Viking hoard to be Awarded £2 Million

Derek McLennan, a British metal detectorist who unearthed the richest collection of unique Viking artifacts ever found in the UK will receive an astonishing £2 million (US$2.6m) as a reward. The amount is ex gratia and has been set to reflect the market value of the find. Amateur Treasure Hunter About to Receive 2 Million Pounds for his Discovery Derek McLennan discovered the 10th-century hoard in a Dumfries and Galloway field (one of 32 unitary council areas of Scotland) in 2014. The incredibly valuable treasure includes silver bracelets and brooches,…

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Uncategorized 

Mysterious Viking Sword Made With Technology From the Future?

The Viking sword Ulfberht was made of metal so pure it baffled archaeologists. It was thought the technology to forge such metal was not invented for another 800 or more years, during the Industrial Revolution. About 170 Ulfberhts have been found, dating from 800 to 1,000 A.D. A NOVA, National Geographic documentary titled “Secrets of the Viking Sword”, first aired in 2012, took a look at the enigmatic sword’s metallurgic composition. In the process of forging iron, the ore must be heated to 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit to liquify, allowing the…

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ARCHAELOGY 

Archaeologists Unearth Ruins of Viking Trade Center

Archaeologists excavating on the site of some recently discovered ruins on the northern coast of Western Australia, may have just made the greatest find in the history of the country: the remains an 11th century Viking settlement. The scientists, associated with the Department of Archaeology of the University of Sydney, were called of the site after some locals discovered what looked like the foundation of an ancient building in July, near Derby. The archaeologists, directed by Professor Allison Fletcher, were expecting a site from the early colonial period, but they rapidly realized that they were…

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OTHER 

Amateurs discover Denmark’s largest ever stash of Viking gold

hree amateur archaeologists recently discovered the biggest stash of Viking gold ever found in Denmark. At 900 grams (1.948 pounds), the stash is comprised of seven attractively made bracelets. Six were made out of gold, and one was of silver. The silver piece weighed around 90 grams. Silver and gold objects Photo Credit The Sønderskov museum was very excited about the bracelets, which were recently handed over to them. They date back to 900AD, and are decorated in a style typical of high-class Viking jewelry. They were found by Poul Nørgaard…

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HISTORY 

Better Identification of Viking Corpses Reveals: Half of the Warriors Were Female

Shieldmaidens are not a myth! A recent archaeological discovery has shattered the stereotype of exclusively male Viking warriors sailing out to war while their long-suffering wives wait at home with baby Vikings. (We knew it! We always knew it.) Plus, some other findings are challenging that whole “rape and pillage” thing, too. (Updated 9/3, see below.) Researchers at the University of Western Australia decided to revamp the way they studied Viking remains. Previously, researchers had misidentified skeletons as male simply because they were buried with their swords and shields. (Female…

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ARCHAELOGY 

USA: Viking Ship Discovered Near Mississippi River

A group of volunteers cleaning up the shores of the Mississippi river near the biggest city in Tennessee, have stumbled upon the remains of an ancient boat encrusted in mud. A team of archeologists from the University of Memphis that was rapidly called to the site, confirmed that the ship is most certainly a Viking knarr, suggesting the Norse would have pushed their exploration of America a lot further than historians previously thought. The heavily damaged ship was found near the confluence of the Wolf and Mississippi rivers, and lies on a private…

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HISTORY 

View From Space Hints at a New Viking Site in North America

A thousand years after the Vikings braved the icy seas from Greenland to the New World in search of timber and plunder, satellite technology has found intriguing evidence of a long-elusive prize in archaeology — a second Norse settlement in North America, further south than ever known. The new Canadian site, with telltale signs of iron-working, was discovered last summer after infrared images from 400 miles in space showed possible man-made shapes under discolored vegetation. The site is on the southwest coast of Newfoundland, about 300 miles south of L’Anse…

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