ARCHAELOGY 

Hitler thought this would never be found, but archaeologists just unearthed his dark secret

The Nazis committed a host of atrocities during the Second World War, but chief among them was their attempted extermination of the Jewish people, along with many other minorities and marginalized groups. As defeat loomed, the Nazis attempted to cover up the evidence of their actions by killing the witnesses and burning their extermination facilities to the ground. One of these sites, a death camp in Sobibor, Poland, was recently excavated, and what they found there is too shocking for words. See after: He Was Hunting A Tiger When He Found…

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ARCHAELOGY 

Why are there Underground Jesuit Caves in Europe filled with Egyptian and Islamic Art?

I‘ve just spent the last few hours trying to figure out why there’s a network of underground Jesuit caves filled with Egyptian, Islamic, Buddhist, Christian, pagan and secular art– and I’m stumped. This is a bit of a first for me and I’m reaching out to you to help explain the mystery… Okay so here’s what I learned so far. Just outside the city of Maastricht, close to the Belgian border, you can find one of the most exquisitely carved limestone quarries in the world known as Jezuïetenberg (Jesuit Cave). The underground passageways that descend…

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ARCHAELOGY 

The city was built for one reason only – to protect it’s citizens from attack

Located deep underground in the Central Anatolia region of Turkey, the underground city of Kaymakli lies hidden and abandoned. Its ancient name is Enegup, and this city was built for one reason only – to protect the citizens of Cappadocia from attack. Underground City Map. Photo Credit Bearing a strong resemblance to another underground city that goes by the name of Derinkuyu, which was also built by the Phrygians in the 7th century, Enegup is one of the hundred hidden cities of Cappadocia. A large room deep underground. Photo Credit The…

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ARCHAELOGY 

An Archaeologist Discovered a Tunnel Sealed for 1,800 Years Under a Temple in Mexico

Teotihuacán was the massive pre-Aztec metropolis that was home to 125,000 people around 400 CE. The remains of the city still stand about 30 miles northeast of Mexico City and it is a popular tourist destination. While the site continues to be studied by archeologists it was largely believed to have given up all of its secrets. That all changed one rainy day in 2003. The city was established around 100 BCE and lasted until 750 CE. It was the largest city in the region, and the sixth largest city…

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ARCHAELOGY 

Mummies From A Mysterious Arctic Civilization Found In The Permafrost

The mummified bodies of an adult and a baby, both wrapped in copper, have been unearthed after being frozen in the Siberian permafrost for centuries. An announcement from the Governor of Yamalo-Nenets District says the recent discovery includes two mummies wrapped in a thick textile material, fur, and tree bark, with the adult encased in copper plates and the baby covered with copper kettle fragments. It’s believed the copper was used for its antimicrobial properties to help preserve the body. The remains were also naturally “refrigerated” by the permafrost of this notoriously cold part of the…

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ARCHAELOGY 

Archaeologists discovered 4,000-year-old intact Egyptian tomb

Ancient Egypt is one of the cradles of civilization and an endless well full of archaeological discoveries and mysteries. The first archaeological excavations in Egypt began in the 18th century and never stopped since then. In 2016, scientists discovered an ancient city more than 7000 years old, and in March 2017 a group of archaeologists found an unopened tomb in the city of Aswan.A team of Spanish archaeologists of the Archaeological Mission from Jaen University made an astonishing discovery of an intact burial chamber in the necropolis of Qubbet el-Hawa, West Aswan,…

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A 3,800-year-old Tableau of Egyptian Boats has been found

Around 120 images of ancient Egyptian boats have been found inside a building in Abydos, Egypt. The building dates back more than 3,800 years and was built close to the tomb of Pharaoh Senwosret III, report archaeologists at the site. The series of images, or tableau as it is called, once looked upon a real boat that sat within the buildings walls states the leader of the excavation, Josef Wegner, a curator at the Penn Museum at the University of Pennsylvania. The wooden boat is now more or less gone with only…

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Remarkable Tattooed Mummy Brought Back To Life In Stunning Realistic Recreation

We still may not know what killed the Señora of Cao in Peru 1,600 years ago, but we now know what she looked like when she was alive. Ira Block/National Geographic; Fundación Augusto N Wiese No one knows what killed the Señora of Cao nearly 1,600 years ago. But whatever the cause, her untimely passing must have been upsetting to her people, the Moche, who lived on the north coast of Peru between approximately and 100 and 700 C.E., at least seven centuries before the more well-known Inca. After the…

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ARCHAELOGY 

Top 10 archaeological discoveries of 2016

2016 has revealed an amazing array of archaeological discoveries, pushing the boundaries of scientific research and our understanding of the past. The following list represents 10 of the most exciting announcements across the year. 1 – Bronze Age stilt houses unearthed in East Anglian Fens Archaeologists have revealed exceptionally well-preserved Bronze Age dwellings during a series of excavations throughout the year at Must Farm quarry in the East Anglian fens that is providing an extraordinary insight into domestic life 3,000 years ago. The settlement, dating to the end of the…

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3000-Year-Old Pharaoh Ramses II Statue Found In Cairo Slum, And It’s “One Of The Most Important Discoveries Ever”

Other ruins of Heliopolis were previously found in the Northern regions of Cairo, making this statue extremely likely to be Ramses II Image credits: Xinhua/ Rex The sun temples were purportedly double the size of Luxor’s Karnak, but were destroyed during Greco-Roman times Image credits: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/ Reuters The unearthing of these statues will hopefully tell us even more about the life of Ancient Egyptian Pharaohs, including Ramses the Great Image credits: Mohamed Abd El Ghany / Reuter Source

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